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Monday, January 09, 2012

David Kinsey - Artist of Distinction - Abstract Amazement


David Duane Kinsey was recently named an Artist of Distinction in Still Point Art Gallery's exhibition: The Abstraction Attraction! He also received a Portfolio Award and, as a result, will have a portfolio of his work published in the gallery's art and literary journal, Still Point Arts Quarterly.

 
Untitled(New White)                                                Untitled(Draw)
[Enlarge]                                                                 [Enlarge

 
Kinsey has two paintings in the exhibition: Untitled(New White) and Untitled(Draw). With their beautiful and entrancing detail, complexity, and structure, the viewer is drawn into the work...drawn into the web of amazement. This web is the result of Kinsey's careful arrangement of line, texture, and color...elements of painting masterfully combined to create compositions that capture.

David Duane Kinsey received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Ringling College of Art and Design in 1997 and his Masters of Fine Arts degree from Yale University in 1999. He taught at his alma mater, Ringling College of Art and Design and State College of Florida from 1999-­2010. Currently, he is an Associate Professor in the Visual and Performing Arts Department at Stonehill College in Massachusetts.
Kinsey's various awards and honors include the George and Segal Foundation Grant for Painters, a Hermitage Artist Residency Fellowship, and a Yale Norfolk Teaching Fellowship. His paintings have been exhibited  in New York, Connecticut, Florida, Washington, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania. 
 

Artist Statement

Embedded in abstract forms, there lies a heightened awareness of the alchemy and visceral properties of paint. This is the fuel that propels the expressionistic responses and reactions of automatism. Obviously the paintings are somewhat preoccupied by the multiple facets of the formal issues of painting. However, I strive to elevate this in an abstract language for ways of talking about ideas of aesthetics, structures, dichotomies, the physical versus the ethereal, internal versus external.

I am interested in the painting's physical presence and that reflection upon the viewer. This can be seen by some of the accumulated gluttonous areas of thick impasto paint (influences: Chaim Soutine, Antoni Tapies, Frank Auerbach) and, at other times, by thin washes or glazes within atmospheric spaces. Some of the shapes are organic reflecting the organic nature of painting itself and the human touch. The geometric shapes often allude to technological references, architecture and/or other structures. When combined, I attempt to have them harmonize with a sense of balance within the variety. Music and aesthetic contemplations are often a major influence of this fusion.

My paintings are incredibly labored over with hours of studio time. I like the idea of them having gone through a type of epic trail, because I would like them be an echo of moments of time that occur in one’s life. And so, I try to mix up the process by which I create them, because they act as markers on a timeline in my experience as a human and artist. By using acrylic paint, I am able to maneuver at a rapid pace to accommodate the improvisational processes that I use. These processes always fluctuate as it relates to my mental temperature. I try to work on about three to five paintings at a time, each with a different process. By having multiple works in progress I have found that I attempt to build them all up like an orchestra. They seem to feed off each other and provide me with advice as “what to do next."


Untitled(New White). 16 x 20 inches. Acrylic on canvas. $1200.
Untitled(Draw). 16 x 20 inches. Acrylic on canvas. $1200.
  

Visit David Kinsey's website


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