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Monday, June 13, 2011

Sushila Oliphant Honors Nature


Midnight Reflection
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Still Point Art Gallery's current exhibition is all about the essential nature of Nature. It was inspired by a passage by Henry David Thoreau, which ends with the words, "We can never have enough of Nature." Three of Sushila Oliphant's paintings were selected for this exhibition, and she was named an Artist of Distinction for her particularly wonderful and meaningful contributions. Two of the paintings are shown here. They are beautiful...colorful, vibrant, rich...the tones are deep, akin to those of a haunting cello or lyric basso profondo. These paintings speak to the grandeur and splendor of Nature, calling us to bow with respect and in worship. Oliphant so perfectly captures that aspect of Nature that makes it bigger and greater than all of us, though we are all contained within it. She captures the spiritual aspect of Nature, that part that feeds our souls, that part that Thoreau honored in his writings about Nature, that part of which we can never have enough. 
 
Artist Statement
I love to capture that wondrous spiritual feeling of awe that certain places produce in me, like meadows, sunsets, a mountain view, canyons, or forests. My paintings come from those feelings and memories of peace and joy, as well as from a deep connection with nature.
Los Pináculos de Daniel
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Painting is my way of communing with the Universe, Source, or God--whatever one may call that divine awareness. It is the food for my soul on its journey to merge with nature and transcend it.
My favorite medium is painting on found wood. I love the way it feels in my hands. I get excited by the various textures along with the strong patterns formed in the wood. I see the whole scene in the wood as I sand it and then all I do is paint it in. I am always very surprised at the final results as they are totally different from what I originally had in mind. I sometimes think someone else slips inside and does the painting for me...and I am always delighted and very grateful.
Midnight Reflection is a memory from a trip with my sister, Penny, through the Mohawk Trail. It was such a magical place...stunningly still. That stately dead tree, surrounded by those radiant flowers and landscape, emitted a deep sense of peace and striving for a higher reality. We reflected about life for hours in that spot.
Los Pináculos de Daniel was inspired by my life in Arizona and a long, lost love that was found again. For fifteen years, I kept it in the closet without working on it--I had a block. I rediscovered and finished it at the same time Daniel and I reconnected a few years ago. He inspired me to complete it. These are the mountains we have crossed to be together and, as we look back towards them, they have become part of our beautiful scenery.

Biography 
 
Sushila Oliphant draws her inspiration from inner traditions and her spiritual teachers. She grew up in Hampden Highlands, Maine and Chenango Bridge, New York. During the harsh winter months in Maine, she and her sister, Penny, were taught painting and drawing by their grandmother, a graduate of Pratt Art Institute. Sushila Oliphant was further inspired by her travels to Canada, Arizona, Colorado, Florida, as well as throughout the Yucatan and Chiapas in Mexico, Guatemala, and Belize.

Oliphant works in pen and ink, acrylic, pastels, colored pencils, graphite, and watercolor, and with collage and digital photography. Nature and spiritual themes are her favorite subjects. She attended the University of Maine, the University of Arizona, and Miami Dade Community College in Florida. She has won several awards for her work in art shows in Maine, Colorado, Florida, and Mexico. Oliphant owns a graphic and web design business called Harmonic Designs. She currently resides in Miami, Florida.  


Midnight Reflection. 9.25 x 12 inches. Acrylic on plywood. $1200.
Los Pináculos de Daniel. 24 x 24 inches. Acrylic on plywood. $3500.
Still Point Art Gallery
June 13, 2011

1 comment:

  1. Nature has its own path of creativity and we all should respect them to be much more precious in the life.

    ReplyDelete